Archive for August, 2007

Dual Source: A Panacea?

I hope that you have enjoyed the article “Dual Source vs. Single Source.” Being in the profession so many years, I’ve seen preferences for dual sourcing vs. single sourcing go back and forth like a pendulum. In my college purchasing class, dual sourcing was introduced as a “Japanese purchasing technique” that was made to seem so cutting edge at the…

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Purchasing Survey

My fellow purchasing blogger, Tim Minahan from the Supply Excellence blog, tipped me off to a survey that Supply & Demand Chain Executive Magazine is doing. Some surveys I like, some I detest, but it sounds like this one has a guaranteed report for all participants as well as a chance to win a prize from Procuri, so it just…

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How To Beat The Price Increase

Since we’ve begun offering online purchasing classes in 2001, we’ve kept our prices the same. But over those same years, we have improved the quality of our purchasing education tremendously. And even though we feel that a price increase after 6-1/2 years is warranted, we want to do three things for you: Keep the price increase small; Give you tips…

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A Spend Management Development…

Jason Busch over at the Spend Matters blog has today announced the launch of Spend Matters Navigator – what appears to be an aggregation of purchasing and supply management Web content searchable in a single portal. I’ve played around with it a bit already and it is pretty cool! There’s a lot to like about this new purchasing research tool.…

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How Bad Is Golfing With Suppliers?

A huge photo of Pittsburgh Mayor Luke Ravenstahl consumed about 80% of the above-the-fold space on the front page of today’s Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. It accompanied an article describing the mini-scandal in which Ravenstahl is embroiled. His transgression? Golfing with city suppliers. Yes, Ravenstahl accepted two days of golf in the Mario Lemieux Celebrity Invitational from UPMC and the Pittsburgh Penguins…

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Reverse Supplier Scorecarding

Purchasing Magazine’s new cover story “Pop Quiz: How would your suppliers grade you? Ask them.” features some quotes from yours truly. Dave Hannon really did a good job compiling a lot of information on the topic. It’s probably the most comprehensive resource I know of on the topic. I am a big fan of collecting supplier feedback. Hopefully, this article…

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Negotiating A Contract

I hope that you have enjoyed the article “Negotiating The Ultimate Contract.” Writing this article reminded me of a “war story” from my early purchasing days – not necessarily on negotiating the Ultimate Contract, but more in terms of making sure that the supplier is most competitive on all variables. The company I worked for was buying signage like crazy.…

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The Purchasing Agent’s Nightmare…

Most ambitious purchasing departments would love to have their CEO’s passionately telling the public about their work in managing supplier relationships. But not when your CEO has to make a video like this. To Your Career,Charles Dominick, SPSMPresidentNext Level Purchasing, Inc.Struggling To Have A Rewarding Purchasing Career?Earn Your SPSM Certification Online Athttp://www.NextLevelPurchasing.com

Buyers: Blow Off Some Steam

Tim Minahan over at the Supply Excellence blog borrowed/adapted a fun idea of documenting the top cliches in purchasing and supply management. If you’re a buyer, you are probably currently in a frustrated mood because a supplier didn’t deliver as promised, your most difficult internal customer just read you the riot act, and your boss just denied your vacation request…

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The Bad News From China Doesn’t Stop…

As soon as I logged onto the Internet this morning, two China-sourcing-related stories caught my eye: China Toy Boss Kills Self After Recall Slaves Found In Chinese Brick Factories One interesting quote from the former article was “Chinese companies often have long supply chains, making it difficult to trace the exact origin of components, chemicals and food additives.” I’ve seen…

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